Top Menu Right My Account View Cart
9Oct/1019

Spherical Yogurt Recipe

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (4 votes, average: 3.75)
Loading ... Loading ...
RedditStumbleUponPrintFriendlyShare

This molecular gastronomy recipe is based on the reverse spherification technique which is great for ingredients rich in calcium like yogurt.

Yogurt Sphere Ingredients

- 200 g (7 oz) of plain yogurt (do not use no fat or low fat yogurt because the calcium content is lower. Alternatively you can use no fat but you will have to add calcium gluconate)

- 90 g (3.2 oz) heavy cream

- 30 g sugar (1 oz)

Spherical yogurt (spherification) -720

Alginate Bath

- 1500 g (35 oz) of water

- 7.5 g sodium alginate

Preparation

Start by preparing the alginate bath. Mix the sodium alginate in the water using an immersion blender until the sodium alginate is completely dissolved. If this is your first time doing this, be aware that this may take longer than expected. Let it rest for 24 hours in the fridge so that the air that has entered the mixture disappears and the sodium alginate is completely rehydrated.

To create the yogurt mixture just mix all the ingredients together.

You are now ready to start the spherification process! Remove the alginate bath from the fridge. Scoop the yogurt mixture with a half sphere 5ml measure spoon and carefully pour it into the alginate bath. It is important that the yogurt spheres don’t touch since they would stick together. Leave the yogurt spheres "cooking" for about 2 minutes in the alginate bath and then carefully remove them using a slotted spoon.

Then rinse them very gently with water and strain them carefully. If desired they could be stored in a sealed container with water in the fridge. To improve the technique read 10 Tips to Create a Perfect Sphere.

Serving suggestions 

- Serve with a raspberry coulis

- Sprinkle with lemon zest

- Serve with cucumber slices

RedditStumbleUponPrintFriendlyShare
  • Pingback: Spherification | www.spherification.com

  • Pingback: Esfera de Iogurte | Gastronomy Lab – Gastronomia Molecular e Sous-vide

  • http://mydogskinallergies.com dog skin allergies

    that looks like something different

  • sergio gonzalez

    Good morning

    When pouring the yogurt into the alginate bath my sphere doesnt create at all. It gets round in the botton but in the upper side there is like a “sock” attached to the sphere. I manage to twist it and kind of look round. In the end this sphere is to weak and breaks when trying to “fish it”.

    I tried to add calcium lactate to the milky mix but it doenst work at all. Not sure about the yogurt I’m using.

    I’ll apreciate any help.

    • Anonymous

      Make sure you are using full fat yogurt and if the membrane is still not strong, just leave the sphere in the bath a little longer. To reduce the “sock” effect like you call it, try immersing the spoon in water before you scoop the yogurt and clean the bottom of the spoon with a wet paper towel. Also follow these tips http://www.molecularrecipes.com/spherification/10-tips-create-perfect-sphere/
      I hope this helps!

  • sergio gonzalez

    Good morning

    When pouring the yogurt into the alginate bath my sphere doesnt create at all. It gets round in the botton but in the upper side there is like a “sock” attached to the sphere. I manage to twist it and kind of look round. In the end this sphere is to weak and breaks when trying to “fish it”.

    I tried to add calcium lactate to the milky mix but it doenst work at all. Not sure about the yogurt I’m using.

    I’ll apreciate any help.

  • Elly

    Hi! can i use greek yoghurt too or would the thickness effect the result? thanks for the wonderful site…

    • Anonymous

      Yes you can. If you want the inside of the sphere to be more liquid, just mix the yoghurt with some milk or cream.

  • QuantumChef

    Yes, you can carbonate the spheres! We’ve done that with the mojito spheres but the same method works with any spherification recipe. http://www.molecularrecipes.com/spherification/carbonated-mojito-spheres/

    • Savannah

      Awesome! Is there any way to make the spheres out of some kind of fruit juice?  Like, is there a recipe that you know of that uses citrus juices?  Sorry for all the questions, I pretty much have no idea what im talking about…

  • Jon hopkinson

    Non Fat yogurt has the same or more calcium than high fat or normal yogurt. The calcium is in the skim milk pportion not in the fat

  • Lara

    Does it matter if we use granulated or powdered sugar?

    • QuantumChef

      No, both will work.

  • skillpack

    what do you even use this stuff for?

  • Prasad Kalyanasundaram

    Hi

    I would like to try this at home- Can I leave the heavy cream out? or is it a must for the spherification process?

    Thx
    Prasad

    • QuantumChef

      Yes, you can.

      • Prasad Kalyanasundaram

        thank you QuantumChef.. I will try this- After doing a vanilla yoghurt ravioli apologies for the pun), I would like to inject some syrups that are typical of indian chaat dishes, possibly even suspend a few solids in it… Will try and post results here. There is not a whole lot of innovation using molecular gastronomy in indian cuisine and it is a good area to experiment in..

        • QuantumChef

          Sounds great! Check out Gaggan if you haven’t already http://www.eatatgaggan.com/

          • Prasad Kalyanasundaram

            Thank you for the link. I have checked out Gaggan’s website and have read his interviews. He lives and works out of Thailand. I have looked at Jiggs Kalra as well, but beyond them, there is not much material available on the net, most of the material and videos that you see are tailored to suit western and other international cuisine.

          • QuantumChef

            Looking forward to see your own creations!